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Interhack Company Our Mission

Our Mission

Interhack's motto is Aut viam inveniam aut faciam, attributed to Hannibal but often used as a motto by scientific, academic, and military organizations. The scientific nature of our work, our participation in academic pursuits, and our conduct of defense operations in a military-like fashion makes the motto particularly appropriate for us.

Mission

To make computers and the information they provide worthy of trust.

Vision

Our clients are going about solving real-world problems, whether delivering goods and services, reconciling business records, or arguing a legal matter before a court. Interhack engages with our clients' problems and the resources available. We then propose a path to achieve the mission: making the computers and their information worthy of trust.

When that means that information is favorable to the client, we ensure that the information is found and clearly articulated. When the information is not favorable to our client, it's our job to be sure that the client understands not only what the information is but why it is not favorable, but also any limits of certainty.

In any case, Interhack is a firm that asks the right questions and finds the answers that can be relied upon within a reasonable degree of scientific certainty. Whether the result needs to be presented in the boardroom or the courtroom, Interhack's answer is authoritative.

Founder's Intent

Interhack is an organization dedicated to closing the gap between the state of the art and the state of the practice in computing. We mean to draw people who need reliable computing infrastructure and reliable answers from computers as clients. We mean to draw scientists and engineers dedicated to the highest standards of their profession to engage with clients and address matters of method. We mean to draw support professionals and associates who want to connect market need with our teams' capability.

Etymology

The word Interhack is a neologism that comes from the Latin prefix inter- ("among") and the word hack, long used in computer science to mean "an appropriate application of ingenuity." The idea is that we draw from among different disciplines and influences to define a defensible method to achieve the objective before us.

While media and sometime even legal sources will use "hack" to mean to intrude without authorization, the best word for this is "crack." Ultimately, as hacker Eric Raymond wrote, the difference is that "hackers build things, and crackers break them."

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